Engineering class travels to Green Bank, WV, conducts radio telescope research

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  • The Green Bank Observatory is home to over 9 working radio telescopes.

  • Engineering students explore the Green Bank Observatory gift shop before taking a tour of the facility.

  • While cell phones and digital cameras were not allowed near the radio telescopes, tour members could take pictures from an observation deck.

  • The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope has a diameter of 100 meters, making it the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope.

  • Sophomore Evangelina Velker demonstrates the movement of radio waves through the air. This knowledge was used to better understand how radio telescopes function.

  • Sophomore Stella Alexiou uses metal rods and a wheel to observe changes in wavelength and how to manipulate a radio wave.

  • The Green Bank Exhibit Hall features an infrared camera, where different objects can be used to observe how infrared waves move through different materials.

  • Sophomores Arianna Casterline and Mia Constantin solve a puzzle showing the difference between an optical and infrared view of the sun.

  • Sophomores Evangelina Velker and Leslie Bueno-Aguilar compare and contrast different gases.

  • The Green Bank Exhibit Hall features a moveable model of the 100 meter Green Bank Telescope.

  • In between observation shifts and activities, students played games like football and frisbee soccer.

  • A group of students walk back to the bunkhouse at 7:30 A.M. after using the 40-foot telescope to make observations.

  • Sophomore Omid Akbari analyzes his data collected from the 40-foot radio telescope.

  • Sophomores Evangelina Velker and Alexander Macauley takes notes and compare their information observed through the radio telescopes with other groups.

  • After using the 40-foot telescope to detect hydrogen the night before, group members compare data to look for patterns.

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