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Wyatt’s final dance choreography honors Amber Corriston

Senior+Jane+Wyatt+performing+her+piece+%22Nascent%22+at+the+Valley+Dance+Showcase+as+an+ode+to+Amber+Corriston.
Senior Jane Wyatt performing her piece

Senior Jane Wyatt performing her piece "Nascent" at the Valley Dance Showcase as an ode to Amber Corriston.

Bob Adamek

Bob Adamek

Senior Jane Wyatt performing her piece "Nascent" at the Valley Dance Showcase as an ode to Amber Corriston.

Oziel Valdez, Staff Reporter

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Senior Jane Wyatt has performed her last dance on the HHS stage. Choreographed to incorporate snippets of her previous dances throughout the years, Wyatt performed it several times in showcases.

“When I started, I had a completely different idea in my head. I didn’t think that this dance would be the best idea, I just didn’t have any other ideas. I thought the dance would be choppy and it wasn’t going to go to well together, [but] I put on the song and I started to piece things together. I was adding my own choreography to mend everything together. Not only did my dance turn out great, but on another level it represented what it’s like to dance here,” Wyatt said.

Wyatt used her dance to make dance teacher Amber Corriston proud of her. Corriston has become a big influence for Wyatt, and Wyatt honored that with her dance.

“[Amber] Corriston runs an amazing program. She doesn’t only care about our dancing, but also developing us as people. Mrs. Corriston has prepared me better than any other adult or teacher in my life on what college is going to be like and what adult life is going to be like. She’s not only looking at my dance grades and my dance technique, but she’s looking at my other grades and making sure that I’m always fine,” Wyatt said.

Before Wyatt met Corriston, she had no motivation for college. Wyatt states that Corriston was a big impact on Wyatt’s decision to do dance at JMU.

“Before high school, I felt like I needed to work twice as hard as everyone and it wasn’t great. When I got to high school, after sophomore year, I was burnt out. I felt like I had to fight so hard to accomplish anything academically. I just thought, ‘Why would I go to college for four years just to do the same thing and be unsuccessful?’ I felt like I didn’t have anything that would occupy me for four years. I didn’t find anything that I loved enough that I could study for four years and then have a career in,” Wyatt said. “After spending time with Mrs. Corriston and time with the dance program, I decided that I wouldn’t be happier if I wasn’t doing dance. I think this is because Mrs. Corriston’s super contagious love for dance pushed me.”

Wyatt has been a part of the dance strand in the Fine Arts Academy since her freshman year. When Wyatt auditioned, there were only two people auditioning, and now Wyatt has noticed that there are many more.

“When I auditioned, it was just me and senior Karina Vasquez auditioning for the dance strand. We were the only two people in our strand. I sometimes come to the dance auditions and now it’s 15 girls and some boys too, and I just find that so amazing. Being able to be a part of the beginning [is] something that’s amazing…I would say that my imprint on HHS is being a part of the start of the arts,” Wyatt said.

Corriston feels proud of Wyatt, and hopes for big things in her future.

“I am honored that Jane has taken advice, worked hard, and will be going to college to major in dance, when she never even thought that college would be in her future. She and I approach things very differently and I have definitely pushed her in many ways in dance and in life skills, and it’s really exciting to see that she’s ready to continue to push herself further,” Corriston said. “I hope that Jane meets wonderful people to collaborate with and learn from in her college journey and that she surrounds herself with people that will make her unique and creative choreographic ideas come to life. Ultimately, I hope that college will open doors to things that she’s never even thought of doing and that she will dance her way through the adventure of life.”

Wyatt will continue her experience in dance for the next four years at JMU, hoping to have a career that involves dance.

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Wyatt’s final dance choreography honors Amber Corriston