Senior Kevin Pizano (left) and freshman Sam Rooker (right) are the co-athors of the ¨Popular Predictions¨ series. Check out some of their other reviews on their staff profiles.

Hannah Miller

Popular Predictions: A Series

December 20, 2018

Popular Predictions is a series by senior Kevin Pizano and freshman Sam Rooker where the two review films that they believe are worthy of the 2019 award season. Every week, the two will post a review until the big finale: the Oscars. 

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‘The Favourite’ provides wonderfully wicked period drama

Olivia Coleman plays Queen Anne in

Olivia Coleman plays Queen Anne in "The Favorite." Pizano believes her portrayal was one of the best female performances of the year.

Atsushi Nishijima/Fox Searchlight

Olivia Coleman plays Queen Anne in "The Favorite." Pizano believes her portrayal was one of the best female performances of the year.

Atsushi Nishijima/Fox Searchlight

Atsushi Nishijima/Fox Searchlight

Olivia Coleman plays Queen Anne in "The Favorite." Pizano believes her portrayal was one of the best female performances of the year.

‘The Favourite’ provides wonderfully wicked period drama

Synopsis

The Favourite” is a twisted tale of lust, manipulation and ambition between 18th century lovers. Director Yorgos Lanthimos creates an extravagant period piece filled with dark humor and powerful performances. Set in 18th century England, Queen Anne’s world is changed when her right-hand woman, Sarah Churchill’s (Rachel Weisz) younger cousin Abigail Hill (Emma Stone), arrives looking for work. Things go awry when Abigail discovers how close the queen and her duchess really are. A conflict arises as Abigail and Sarah climb to be among the queen’s favorite, leading to a battle of the wits between the two.

A trio of grand performances

The fierce trio of women shine in performances worthy of award recognition, with Olivia Colman as Queen Anne being one of the best (and my favorite) female performances of the year. Her acting prevails as humorous and at times heart-wrenching. Whether it be screeching at the top of her lungs towards a servant or a long take of her facial expression showing jealousy, she always finds ways of expressing her performance range. Despite her actions being seen as humorous or over dramatic, she is later found to have a heartbreaking backstory (involving her seventeen rabbits) that shifts the story to a tragicomedy. Sarah’s character is driven by being frighteningly authoritative and is practically the ruler of the country, as Queen Anne is a frail leader. Abigail serves as a maid, however she quickly climbs the social ladder through her charismatic and manipulative ways toward the queen. The high-school type of drama between Churchill and Hill is nothing short of entertaining with their scenes plagued with tension and strong dialogue. Viewers will soon realize there is no one to root for within “The Favourite,” but that’s exactly why it’s such an entertaining experience to witness.

Technically marvelous period-piece film making

Lanthimos continues his trend of making his films as deeply weird and original as possible. There are duck races, seventeen rabbits hopping around the kingdom and a memorable ball sequence filled with absurd dancing. As Lanthimos is known for many eccentric film projects, “The Favourite serves as the most mainstream film to date that is easily understood. The script blends dark wit and riveting drama together in such a skillfully constructed and original way. Three-time Oscar winner Sandy Powell decorates the cast with lavish costumes and powdered wigs, easily being the best costumed film of the year. Cinematographer Robbie Ryan shot the film similar to a Rembrandt painting, which has not been seen since Kubrick’s “Barry Lyndon.” Among the many technical aspects, my biggest complaint was the use of the fisheye lens for specific scenes of the film. I understand the directors intended purpose for the photography, however it bothered my viewing of an already gorgeous film to look at. Likewise, people who are not fond of period dramas, I would highly recommend viewing this engaging black comedy that is sure to reign as a favorite across the award season.

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‘Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse’ is best animated film in long time

Rooker is confident that with excellent writing and visuals, Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse has the potential to be recognized with some of the best films of the year as an animated feature.

Rooker is confident that with excellent writing and visuals, Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse has the potential to be recognized with some of the best films of the year as an animated feature.

Sony Pictures Animation

Rooker is confident that with excellent writing and visuals, Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse has the potential to be recognized with some of the best films of the year as an animated feature.

Sony Pictures Animation

Sony Pictures Animation

Rooker is confident that with excellent writing and visuals, Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse has the potential to be recognized with some of the best films of the year as an animated feature.

‘Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse’ is best animated film in long time

Intro

2018 was a great year for films. However, there was one film that pushed the boundaries of what film is capable of: “Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse”. Most of you are probably thinking to yourself: “Sam, really, an animated film? Isn’t that some kind of kids movie? You probably just picked it because you’re a comic book fan.” Into the Spider-Verse is so much more than just another comic book movie, it’s a beautiful work of art that totally changes preconceived notions of what an animated film should be, and that makes it the best film of 2018. There were several factors that went into my pick and if you want to know why, not only do you need to see this cinematic masterpiece, but I urge you to keep reading.

Synopsis

Into the Spider-Verse follows Miles Morales (Shameik Moore), who is a high school student that was recently accepted into an elite boarding school. As Miles is walking to his new school and greeting his friends, Miles’ Dad (Brian Tyree Henry) picks him up in his police cruiser when Miles falls down on the pavement. On Miles’ drive to school we can see on surrounding screens and newspapers that there is a resident Spider-Man (Chris Pine) in Miles’ universe. After an embarrassing confrontation with his dad, Miles goes to each of his classes and starts to get bogged down with all the work he has to do. After school, he meets up with his uncle Aron (Mahershala Ali), who is the person that Miles connects with the most, and he finds ways of spending time with him. They go to a abandoned subway tunnel where Miles puts up his graffiti. During this scene Miles is walking out, and a radioactive Alchemex spider bites him. We see the venom of the spider course through Miles’ veins as he slaps off the spider off with a grunt.

Miles begins to experience weird things. He goes to confront a girl he met the previous day, Gwen Stacy (Hailee Steinfeld), but when he talks to her his hand sticks to her hair and the nurse is forced to cut Gwen’s hair. Through more embarrassing events, we see that Miles has obtained the same powers that Spider-Man has. That night he ventures back to the tunnel where the spider was, but when he starts to look for the insect, he hears strange noises and ventures further into the tunnels. He comes to an enormous structure made of hexagonal white tiles, and just as he is about to venture into the tunnel the gargantuan Green Goblin (Jorma Taccone) busts out of it chased by Spider Man. After a back and forth between Miles and Spider-Man, Spider-Man tells Miles he needs to shut down the “Super Collider.” We are introduced to the mafia crime lord, Kingpin (Liev Schreiber), when he makes the call to turn on the machine from his viewing box in the wall of the Collider. Several universes open and we see that different parts of New York morph and change in ways that are reminiscent of the art styles of the other universes. The test goes wrong and the collider collapses. Miles exits the rubble and sees a dying Spider-Man lying on a stack of rubble. Spider-Man tells Miles that he needs to shut down the supercollider in order to save New York and hands him a U.S.B stick that has a code to shutdown the machine.

The rest of the film chronicles Miles’ path to becoming his own Spider-Man and shutting down the Super Collider. He joins forces with Spider-Gwen, alternate reality Spider-Man (Jake Johnson), Spider-Man Noir (Nicholas Cage), Penny Parker (Kimiko Glenn), Peter Porker (John Mulaney) and Aunt May (Lily Tomlin) in order to take down Kingpin and his mischievous henchmen. There are twists and turns along the way that surprised me every time, and there were multiple moments that gave me chills when they came up on screen. The visuals are paired with an original hip hop score, and the song “What’s Up Danger?” is perfect for a series of shots showing Miles coming into his own.

Artistic Style

The visual style is beautiful in a way that is difficult to describe. Every frame feels like reading a comic book with interesting new spins on classic characters. Never once did I find the experience cheap or inconsistent, and because of this, I think it truly works. I smiled to myself when a specific sound would play in the audio and text bubbles would come up on screen that mimics the sound being played. There were small details such as different frames being totally made up Halftone dots that added to the immersion of the film. I loved the fact that every Spider-Man was drawn in a different art style that made each one feel like a unique and fully realized character from a different dimension. Spider-Man Noir is done in a black and white Noir, Penny Parkers Spider-Man is drawn like an anime. Spider Ham is drawn like classical animation and Miles Morales, alternate reality Peter Parker and Spider Gwen are drawn in a contemporary comic book style. However, the animators never sacrifice the human element of character for style over substance, which holds the film together.    

Writing   

Into the Spider-Verse has excellent writing as well as visuals, and that factor ultimately makes it the best film of 2018. There is so much care put into every character in the film and plot, always from Miles’ point of view. Phil Lord and Rodney Rothman knew the characters they were writing thoroughly. Every character in the film changes or evolves. Miles Morales realizes that he can’t be like his universe Spider-Man, he has to figure out what it means for him to wear the mask. Alternate reality Peter Parker mentors Miles through the toughest parts of becoming a hero, and learns that he is ready to be a father in addition to being a better Spider-Man. Gwen Stacy learns that in she needs to let go of her guilt over Peter Parker’s death and let people back in to her life. Spider-Man Noir realizes that the his universe doesn’t have to view the world in black and white, but rather that it is full of unseen colors. Penny Parker realizes that in order to become a better spider person she needs to let go of her father. Even the main villain of the film, Kingpin, realized that he will never get his family back and ends up losing his humanity as a result. I’m so glad they made sure each character had a complete arc, because otherwise the plot would have felt weak and lifeless.

Wrap Up

Ultimately, Into the Spider-Verse is an experience. All great films are experiences because film is at its best when you are taken out of your current situation, you empathize with the characters and lose yourself in a different reality for a while. In the words of the great film expert and reviewer Roger Ebert, “If a movie is really working, you forget for two hours your Social Security number and where you car is parked. You are having a vicarious experience. You are identifying, in one way or another, with the people on screen.” There is something for everyone in Into the Spider-Verse. As we are told in the end. “Anyone can wear the mask.” This film sets a new bar for comic book films, and we can expect so much more out of the genre.

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For Pizano, the refreshing romance , incredible supporting cast, memorable soundtrack and meaningful cinematography all contribute to the movie's potential to win Best Picture.

Clay Enos/Warner Bros.

For Pizano, the refreshing romance , incredible supporting cast, memorable soundtrack and meaningful cinematography all contribute to the movie's potential to win Best Picture.

‘A Star is Born’ reincarnates beautiful, emotional romance

Intro

The fourth time’s the charm with another remake of the classic Hollywood story “A Star is Born”. The film serves as the directorial debut of Bradley Cooper, but it also shines a spotlight on pop star Lady Gaga in her biggest film role to date. Cooper’s new take on the complex and romantic tale of two struggling artists is ascended to new musical heights in modern style.

Cooper and Gaga create magic

Our first introduction to country-rockstar Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) is within the first frames of the film at a booming, energized concert scene. In almost an instant, viewers can catch onto his troubling addiction to alcohol and popping pills. This sets into gear the problematic situations that come with being a famous musician. The famed Jackson Maine first meets Ally (Lady Gaga) after a drunken mishap leads him to a drag bar. Ally appears as a deity within his eyes, as she sings a rendition of “La Vie En Rose”. When her gaze locks into his, the two instantly connect at the climax of the song. A chemistry blossoms between the two artistic souls.

Lady Gaga’s on-screen presence as Ally was an absolute delight to witness on the big screen. While she is acknowledged for her voice and charismatic personality, the film’s moments filled with anger and vulnerability sell her as a frontrunner for Best Actress at the Oscars. This is not the first time Gaga has received acclaim for her performances as she went on to win awards portraying The Countess on “American Horror Story: Hotel.” Her character is not much of a departure from her pop star persona, but she manages to transform into an artist seeking fame.

Despite romantic cliches being put here and there, Cooper uses them as a director to craft a love story that feels fresh and original. His direction of the pacing could have been vastly improved within the second act of the film where it tends to drag. However, the third act cleans up nicely as it strikes many emotional cords. Cooper nails it as Jackson Maine because of how he provides a solid portrayal of someone dealing with their inner demons. His current career path has drawn comparisons with Cooper to Clint Eastwood, another example of an actor turned director. With potential behind and in front of the camera, he has the ability to receive recognition as one of the most talented people working in Hollywood today.

A strong supporting cast

While the story is centered on Ally and Jack, supporting characters are utilized as important figures within the story. In particular, Bobby Maine (Sam Elliott) offers a scene-stealing performance as the brother and manager of Jack. The two brothers share a distant, but close relationship out of the fact that Jack “stole” his brothers voice. One of the many heart-wrenching scenes, Bobby drives away after his brother confesses a longtime secret. The emotion within his eyes, ready to flood with tears, show the brotherly love shared between one another. Other strong supporting characters worth mentioning are the protective and loving father of Ally (Andrew Dice Clay) and Jack’s close musical companion (Dave Chappelle).

Memorable, award-worthy soundtrack

“A Star is Born,” is lead by the music sung by romantic duo Jack and Ally.  From piano ballads to country-rock duets, the film’s music is centered on themes such as love, bonding and struggle. At one point, Jackson encourages Ally to join him on stage as he sings “Shallow”, a song that they wrote together. As he sings the first verse, Ally paces on stage to join him on the next. Nervous at first, her vocals increasingly get louder and transition into an passionate-filled aria. I was left feeling exhilarated during the scene, which was the peak of the film for me. “Shallow,” is almost a guaranteed winner for Best Original Song at the 2019 Oscars. But the soundtrack as a whole offers a wide variety of earworm-inducing songs, such as “Black Eyes” and “Always Remember Us This Way”.

Gorgeous and meaningful cinematography

Facial close-ups and colored silhouettes of our titular characters brings the story to an intimate type of love story. Cinematographer Matthew Libatique filmed the concert sequences in a first-person perspective to create an impression that we were directly witnessing the concert.  Libatique perfectly captures the frame of emotional moments that are timed and choreographed at just the right time.

Wrap Up

The story shifts from a dream-like romance to a heavy drama within the next half hour of the film. Ally rises in fame, while Jackson continues to delve towards alcoholic despair. It is the old-fashioned romantic tale that we have all come to know, but with a story that delves into a closer view of a romance struck with flaws. By the last shot of the film, you are left emotionally drained and possibly in need of tissues.

Director Bradley Cooper and actress Lady Gaga are names destined to be heard more as we roll into the next decade. “A Star is Born,” has only garnered momentum as the award season begins and stands as the crowd-pleasing film to beat. Our next review is the only film that stands in the way of “A Star is Born” chances of winning Best Picture at the Oscars. A foreign language film from Netflix, Roma.

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Black Panther stands out as well-crafted, creatively designed film

Rooker believes Black Panther has the potential to win Best Picture , drawing attention to the lack of diversity that had previously been associated with the awards.

Rooker believes Black Panther has the potential to win Best Picture , drawing attention to the lack of diversity that had previously been associated with the awards.

Matt Kennedy/Marvel Studios

Rooker believes Black Panther has the potential to win Best Picture , drawing attention to the lack of diversity that had previously been associated with the awards.

Matt Kennedy/Marvel Studios

Matt Kennedy/Marvel Studios

Rooker believes Black Panther has the potential to win Best Picture , drawing attention to the lack of diversity that had previously been associated with the awards.

Black Panther stands out as well-crafted, creatively designed film

Intro

The first film that we believe is in the running for best picture: Black Panther. The film stands out in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) as one of the most well-crafted and creatively designed films. It has already been put alongside other films competing for Best Picture in the 2019 Golden Globes. It stands out as the only comic book film with the most diverse cast out of all the nominated films. It is a game changer in its approach to the tired old superhero storylines, but what makes it award worthy?

Synopsis

The film opens with a beautiful scene depicting the feud between the different tribes in Wakanda and how the Black Panther was born out of this feud. The first scene cuts to Oakland, California in the year 1992. We meet N’Jobu (Sterling K. Brown), an undercover Wakandan spy. He is having a meeting with Zuri, a fellow Wakandan spy, when there is a knock at the door and the person at the door is revealed to be T’Chaka (John Kani) in his Black Panther suit. T’Chaka accuses N’Jobu of assisting the man he was supposed to find, Ulysses Klaue (Andy Serkis). Zuri reveals that he has been spying for T’Chaka ever since their arrival in Oakland. The scene is cut to a well edited action scene where T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman), Black Panther, extracts his past lover Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o) from an undercover assignment and asks her to attend his Coronation ceremony. The Coronation ceremony starts the following day where T’Challa is challenged in combat by old rival, M’Baku (Winston Duke). T’Challa wins and is crowned king of Wakanda. He is given a heart shaped herb in a ceremony that gives him the powers of the Black Panther. Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan) kills Klaue after he is arrested for trying to sell vibranium on the black market. Killmonger takes Klaue’s body to Wakanda where he is greeted by the Wakandan farmers. He reveals his Wakandan branding and Klaue’s dead body and he is taken to T’Challa. Killmonger challenges T’Challa’s claim to the throne as he is the son of T’Chakas brother, N’Jobu. They proceed to repeat the coronation ceremony seen at the beginning of the film, except this time this time Killmonger is the victor.

Filmmaking Techniques

Director Ryan Coogler creates a rich and expansive world that incorporates West African styles into the futuristic design. The care put into the vision of the masterful world building is what makes the film stand out within the MCU. The score by Ludwig Göransson is beautiful in its percussion of heavy instrumentation. Ludwig drew inspiration from the African countries that he had visited. The visual effects are mind-blowing and they seamlessly tie the film together in a way that other Marvel films often do not. There is also another aspect of Black Panthers production that is fantastic and needs to be recognized: the costuming. The costuming in the film is extremely original while still being faithful to the comics and the place where the film is set. The costuming designer, Ruth E. Carter, referenced the Maasai, Himba, Dogon, Basotho, Tuareg, Turkana, Xhosa, Zulu, Suri and Dinka people in her designs. She also examined appropriate works by Japanese fashion designer Issey Miyake. Each design is stunning in a MCU dominated by boring character designs.

Crafting The Perfect Villain

A great antagonist requires a connection to the protagonist in order to make them have a well-crafted conflict. Killmonger is the neglected ruler who feels as though Wakanda has betrayed him in almost every way, including T’Chakas murder of his father. T’Challa feels as though Wakanda has always been there for him, even through the death of his father. Killmonger believes Wakanda will never support him, so he must fight to obtain the throne. Seeing T’Challa as the golden boy enrages him. This creates a bond because of the fact that they are both cousins, but also fighting for the throne. The antagonist must have more power than the protagonist for most of the story. Where T’Challa is calm and composed for most of the film, Killmonger is erratic and untamed in the way he uses his power. Killmonger is always one step ahead of T’Challa, and while his technology might not be more advanced, he is most definitely T’Challa’s rival in hand to hand combat. Tragedy on both the side of the protagonist and the antagonist make for better characters during a conflict. After the death of his father, T’Challa is still raw with rage, but Killmonger has channeled his rage into his focus on obtaining the mantle of king. Because they both share similarities with each other, they make such excellent foils for one another, but their similarities and unseen bonds are what shape them into well-rounded characters.

Cultural Impact

Awards shows like the Golden Globes and the Oscars have come under scrutiny recently due to the lack of diversity in their nominees. People in the industry are constantly commenting things like, “We need a wider variety of nominees” and, “Why is it that only white filmmakers are nominated?”. Black Panther has the power to change the award industry forever if it wins the award for Best Picture. I strongly believe that it will force the Academy to no longer deny their obvious prejudice in their nominee picks because films are essentially a method for telling a story. Only nominating and showcasing a select few views and messages makes for a surefire way to make sure that your award show shrivels up and dies.

Wrap up

I see no reason as to why Black Panther could not rival the other nominees this awards season. It has all the marks of a well-made film with an incredible score, first rate cinematography and oscar worthy performances. Sure, some will say that because it’s a comic book film it has no right to be in the same league as other critically acclaimed films nominated this year. However, I strongly disagree because Black Panther is just as well made, if not better, as these other films. So I wish it the best of luck in this awards season and I hope to see it get the recognition it deserves. Watch out for next week’s review from Pizano and Rooker, A Star is Born.

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